LENOVO FLEX

Thin and light, foldable, touchscreen laptops with multiple ways to engage; classic laptop mode for maximum productivity, stand mode for an optimal touch experience, tent mode for gaming & entertainment, and tablet mode for extra mobility and practicality.

 

.               FLEX 5 (14″)

 

 

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Thin and light, foldable, touchscreen laptops with multiple ways to engage; classic laptop mode for maximum productivity, stand mode for an optimal touch experience, tent mode for gaming & entertainment, and tablet mode for extra mobility and practicality.

 

.                 FLEX 4(11″)

 

 

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The perfect lightweight 11″ mini laptop for users on the go, the Flex 4 (11) gives you four ways to work & play with an ultra responsive touchscreen, an HD webcam, and 360° of flexible viewing.

 

.                   FLEX 4(14″)

 

 

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The thin and light Flex 4 (14″) is a multimode laptop with state-of-the-art processing power, impressive storage, longer life battery and rapid recharge.

 

.                  FLEX 4(15″)

 

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Powerful and durable, the impressive Flex 4 (15″) is a multimode laptop with a huge storage capacity, all day battery and rapid recharge.

 

 

LENOVO YOGA

Lenovo Yoga (stylized as Lenovo YOGA or simply as YOGΛ) is a range of laptop and tablet computer products from Lenovo, named for their ability to assume multiple form factors due to a hinged screen.

 

.               YOGA BOOK


 
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The Yoga Book is a unique, compact hybrid tablet designed similarly to the Yoga laptops that is available in both Android Marshmallow and Windows 10 Home versions.

Featuring the same “watchband hinge” as the Yoga 3 Pro, the major difference is that the traditional mechanical keyboard is replaced with a pressure-sensitive”Create Pad” that responds to an active stylus with 2,048 levels of pressure and a backlit, touch-sensitive “Halo Keyboard” with haptic feedback.

The device is powered by a Intel Atom x5processor and has a 10.1-inch full HD screen, 4 GB of RAM, and 64 GB of internal storage with microSD card expansion support, Dolby Atmos stereo speakers, and optional 4G LTE. It became available for sale in September 2016.

 

.                  YOGA 710

 

 

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Lenovo announced the Yoga 710 at the Mobile World Congress in 2016. The Yoga 710 comes in versions with 11-inch and 14-inch displays. The 11-inch version uses Intel Core M low-power processors,weighing just 2.35 lbs and a mere 0.58” thin,has 8 gigabytes of memory, and includes a solid-state drive with a capacity up to 256 gigabytes.

The same processor is used in Apple’s 12-inch MacBook. The 14-inch version uses standard Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors and optional Nvidia GeForce 940M or 940MX graphics processors. Both versions use 1080p IPS screens.

 

THE CONS

Many users have discovered that aLinux operating system cannot be installed on many Yoga models including the 900 ISK2, 900 ISK for business and 710.

There has been much accusation and rumour in the computer press including unfounded claims that Lenovo have deliberately prevented Linux from being installed.

The reason that Linux cannot be installed is that Lenovo have implemented the solid state drive (SSD) on these models in RAID mode rather than the more usual AHCI.

RAID mode requires additional drivers from Intel that are provided with Windows (version 7 and later) but not currently provided with Linux.

Intel recommends that all new motherboards using Intel chips should be configured using RAID even for a single disc, since this avoids problems when upgrading an AHCI configuration to multiple RAID drives later.

However, this reason alone is pointless on a laptop where a second disc cannot be installed. Intel also recommends that solid state discs be setup in RAID mode as it provides improved performance with their chips. Lenovo have apparently followed this advice and have also removed the ability to change the mode back to AHCI in the UEFI set up utility.

Although it is theoretically possible to change the mode to AHCI using suitably programmed bootable USB stick, it is not wise to attempt it because the affected models check the UEFI configuration at startup and will detect the change and refuse to boot.

This inability to change to AHCI means that without RAID drivers, either in the system itself and on the installation media, Linux cannot be installed. Claims that this was a deliberate act on the part of Lenovo are unfounded and unproven because there in nothing to prevent the Linux community from writing their own RAID drivers.